Month: May 2016

Whitman

It’s Walt’s turn…

Today is the day on which we remember the birthday of the American poet Walt Whitman, who is quickly approaching his bicentennial birthdate. Born on Long Island and raised in Brooklyn, he went on to become something of an itinerant journalist and editor for various newspapers… and usually getting fired for his ‘progressive’ views on such topics as woman’s rights, slavery and labor issues… May I just take this moment to say that we here in America seem to be still fighting, a lot, about pretty much the same issues to this day. Laws on the books are one thing… An actual change in personal attitudes seems so much further off. Anywho… Whitman said: Have you learned the lessons only of those who admired you, and were tender with you, and stood aside for you? Have you not learned great lessons from those who braced themselves against you, and disputed passage with you? Let your soul stand cool and composed before a million universes. And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral …

GKChesterton

Happy Birthday…

Today is the day when we… or at least I, celebrate the birthday of one of the world’s favorite authors. Well… one of my favorite authors, anyway. I tend to get a bit gushy when I’m discussing a favorite author. Books (and music, and all manner of art) have always been my… well, rescuers from the insanity of the world. A good dose of music – say Debussy, or Pink Floyd – or a ripping good read (such as The Three Musketeers, or Grass (by Sheri S Tepper)) always takes me out of the world, and perhaps more importantly, out of my own skin. Trust me… If I spend too much time inside myself… well… It doesn’t end well, for any of us! Anywho… Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born on this date in 1874 in London. And among so incredibly many other things, Chesterton said: “The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children’s games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is …

Neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin worked with Henry Gustave Molaison, who had severe amnesia, for 50 years -- from the 1953 surgery that caused permanent damage to his brain until his death in 2008.

Too strange for words…

Well… what shall we call it…? Today, in the NY Times, there was an obituary for Dr. Suzanne Corkin, a professor at MIT. The blurb for the obit stated “Among many other contributions, Dr. Corkin’s work helped settle a debate about the function of the hippocampus in retrieving and reliving past experiences.” In one of those strange twists of fate that I’m always affected by, even though the obit was published today, it says that she had died on Tuesday. On Thursday, two days after her passing, but two days before the news arrived at my desktop, the following cartoon ran across the syndicate wires. These cartoons, for those of you unaware, are sometimes drawn weeks in advance, if not months. That’s why most of the topical cartoons are often woefully after the fact; and why editorial cartoons have the advantage over the “funnies”… Only those daily cartoonists who like to work ‘without a net’ can get closer to a typical news cycle in time to be topical. Now, two days after the cartoon runs, we …