All posts tagged: Charles Williams

In Memoriam…

It’s Friday, and I haven’t had the time to even look at the blog, much less write something for it. But today is a rather auspicious day, in a rather sad way. Seventy years ago on this date, the author Charles Williams died. Many people will not have heard of him, and surely many, many more will not have read him. They are to be pitied, in the same way that children who have never had the sheer joy of running through a pristine forest, or of having taken a running plunge into the ocean are to be pitied. They know not what it is they miss.

Happy Birthday, Will…

Okay, yeah, sure… We traditionally celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday on the 23rd of April. But we don’t really know when he was born. We do know he was baptized on this date. Now, I’m as traditional as the next guy. Heck, on a good day, I can take on all comers… tradition wise… But that ding-dang A to Z Challenge thingy didn’t line up properly, to ‘do’ Will on the 23rd. So I’ll ‘do’ him now. Because there are some days that should never go by unremarked…

The English Poetic Mind by Charles Williams – an appreciation, of sorts…

Charles Williams, a contemporary and friend of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien, wrote prolifically about many things, among them literary criticism, plays and poetry, as well as seven wholly remarkable novels, which to this day remain on my must read (and re-read) short list. I find myself agreeing with Lewis in the belief that if a book is worth reading at all, it is worth re-reading many times. A book which, upon a second reading, no matter how much it might have engaged us on the first pass, fails to rekindle the excitement, the wonder, that out-of-body sense of other-worldliness, is a book that probably didn’t elicit those reactions the first time through, but held us through sheer novelty, whether via technical innovation or obtrusiveness of subject matter…