All posts tagged: Ludwig Van Beethoven

Happy Birthday, Ludwig…

You know the story, by now… Ludwig Von Beethoven was born (probably…) on this date in 1770 (maybe…) in Bonn, Germany. What we do know is that, among other things, he wrote (possibly…) the greatest piece of musical literature of all time… so far… I suppose it’s always possible someone will surpass this work in beauty, grace, perfection and all the other adjectives we associate with it… That would be something to see (and hear!). I wonder if I’ll ever see it… But… really… unless you believe it’s possible, it’s not likely you’d recognize it when it did arrive. Well… I don’t have a problem in the concept of exceptional talent residing in a single individual. I don’t think for one minute that mankind has an upper limit to our ability to exceed prior limits. I don’t have a problem, for example, in ascribing all the works of Shakespeare to that unknown from Stratford-Upon-Avon… And I will rejoice if the 9th is indeed surpassed one day. As for me and my house… we believe…         Image …

Happy Birthday, Will…

Okay, yeah, sure… We traditionally celebrate Shakespeare’s birthday on the 23rd of April. But we don’t really know when he was born. We do know he was baptized on this date. Now, I’m as traditional as the next guy. Heck, on a good day, I can take on all comers… tradition wise… But that ding-dang A to Z Challenge thingy didn’t line up properly, to ‘do’ Will on the 23rd. So I’ll ‘do’ him now. Because there are some days that should never go by unremarked…

Happy 244th, Ludwig…

Today is the traditional birth date of Ludwig Van Beethoven. We don’t know for sure when he was born, but we do know he was christened on the 17th – and the tradition at the time was to christen a child the day after its birth. Few composers have ever equalled him in importance, and none have surpassed him. His 9th symphony is considered by many to be the greatest piece ever written. I would contend his string quartets are at least as important; but string quartets aren’t as glamorous as the big band stuff… But that’s just a theory… I could be wrong… Through the years conductors have taken to playing the quartets with full orchestral string sections, as if assigning additional players might make up for what is lost in intimacy and ensemble.